IsraPundit

WE'VE MOVED! IsraPundit has relocated to www.israpundit.com. Click here to go there now.
News and views on Israel, Zionism and the war on terrorism.

April 07, 2003

Well we all knew something like this

Herewith some staggering facts and figures. This is worth copying and spreading around.
some In this time of debate on whether we should go into Iraq without UN approval, and why the French and German's are so adamant about vetoing the use of force, it's important to get the facts so we can make intelligent, informed opinions. Too many people who spiel anti-US and anti-Bush arguments are not in the habit of taking the time to research the facts. Most of them get their information in 30 second doses on TV while they are channel surfing between the "West Wing", some idiot sitcom, or the newest "reality show". Being informed at this critical juncture in history is every American's duty. More time spent researching and less time watching will benefit our society.

The following quote, from a speech by Teddy Roosevelt in 1910 should be taken to heart by everyone who has been "round-heeled" and have done nothing but critisize Pres. Bush on the Iraq debate; "It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat " .

Now take some time and read the important following report.

Facts on Who Benefits From Keeping Saddam Hussein In Power by The Heritage Foundation, February 28, 2003

France:

[ 1 ] According to the CIA World Factbook, France controls over 22.5 percent of Iraq's imports.

[ 2 ] French total trade with Iraq under the oil-for-food program is the third largest, totaling $3.1 billion since 1996, according to the United Nations.

[ 3 ] In 2001 France became Iraq's largest European trading partner. Roughly 60 French companies do an estimated $1.5 billion in trade with Baghdad annually under the U.N. oil-for-food program.

[ 4 ] France's largest oil company, Total Fina Elf, has negotiated a deal to develop the Majnoon field in western Iraq. The Majnoon field purportedly contains up to 30 billion barrels of oil.

[ 5 ] Total Fina Elf also negotiated a deal for future oil exploration in Iraq's Nahr Umar field. Both the Majnoon and Nahr Umar fields are estimated to contain as much as 25 percent of the country's reserves.

[ 6 ] France's Alcatel company, a major telecom firm, is negotiating a $76 million contract to rehabilitate Iraq's telephone system.

[ 7 ] From 1981 to 2001, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), France was responsible for over 13 percent of Iraq's arms imports .

Germany

[ 8 ] Direct trade between Germany and Iraq amounts to about $350 million annually, and another $1 billion is reportedly sold through third parties.

[ 9 ] It has recently been reported that Saddam Hussein has ordered Iraqi domestic businesses to show preference to German companies as a reward for Germany's "firm positive stand in rejecting the launching of a military attack against Iraq." It was also reported that over 101 German companies were present at the Baghdad Annual exposition.

[ 10 ] During the 35th Annual Baghdad International Fair in November 2002, a German company signed a contract for $80 million for 5,000 cars and spare parts.

[11] In 2002, Daimler Chrysler was awarded over $13 million in contracts for German trucks and spare parts.

[12] German officials are investigating a German corporation accused of illegally channeling weapons to Iraq via Jordan. The equipment in question is used for boring the barrels of large cannons and is allegedly intendedfor Saddam Hussein's Al Fao Supercannon project.

Russia

[13] According to the CIA World Factbook, Russia controls roughly 5.8 percent of Iraq's annual imports.

[ 14 ] Under the U.N. oil-for-food program, Russia's total trade with Iraq was somewhere between $530 million and $1 billion for the six months ending in December of 2001.

[ 15 ] According to the Russian Ambassador to Iraq, Vladimir Titorenko, new contracts worth another $200 million under the U.N. oil-for-food program are to be signed over the next three months.

[ 16 ] Soviet-era debt of $7 billion through $8 billion was generated by arms sales to Iraq during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war. Russia's LUKoil negotiated a $4 billion, 23-year contract in 1997 to rehabilitate the 15 billion-barrel West Qurna field in southern Iraq. Work on the oil field was expected to commence upon cancellation of U.N. sanctions on Iraq. The deal is currently on hold.

[ 17 ] In October 2001, Salvneft, a Russian-Belarus company, negotiated a $52 million service contract to drill at the Tuba field in Southern Iraq.

[ 18 ] In April 2001, Russia's Zaruezhneft company received a service contract to drill in the Saddam, Kirkuk, and Bai Hassan fields to rehabilitate the fields and reduce water incursion. A future $40 billion Iraqi-Russian economic agreement, reportedly signed in 2002, would allow for extensive oil exploration opportunities throughout western Iraq.

[19 ] The proposal calls for 67 new projects, over a 10-year time frame, to explore and further develop fields in southern Iraq and the Western Desert, including the Suba, Luhais, West Qurna, and Rumaila projects. Additional projects added to the deal include second-phase construction of a pipeline running from southern to northern Iraq, and extensive drilling and gas projects. Work on these projects would commence upon cancellation of sanctions.

[ 20 ] Russia's Gazprom company over the past few years has signed contracts worth $18 million to repair gas stations in Iraq.

[ 21 ] The former Soviet Union was the premier supplier of Iraqi arms. From 1981 to 2001, Russia supplied Iraq with 50 percent of its arms.

China

[22] According to the CIA World Factbook, China controls roughly 5.8 percent of Iraq's annual imports.

[ 23 ] China National Oil Company, partnered with China North Industries Corp., negotiated a 22-year-long deal for future oil exploration in the Al Ahdab field in southern Iraq.

[ 24 ] In recent years, the Chinese Aero-Technology Import-Export Company (CATIC) has been contracted to sell "meteorological satellite" and "surface observation" equipment to Iraq. This contract was approved by the U.N. oil-for-food program.

[ 25 ] CATIC also won approval from the U.N. in July 2000 to sell $2 million worth of fiber optic cables. This and similar contracts approved were disguised as telecommunications gear. These cables can be used for secure data and communications links between national command and control centers and long-range search radar, targeting radar, and missile-launch units, according to U.S. officials. In addition, China National Electric Wire & Cable and China National Technical Import Telecommunications Equipment Company are believed to have sold Iraq $6 million and $15.5 million worth of communications equipment and other unspecified supplies, respectively.

[ 26 ] According to a report from SIPRI, from 1981 to 2001, China was the second largest supplier of weapons and arms to Iraq, supplying over 18 percent of Iraq's weapons imports.

Sources:

[1]Central Intelligence Agency, The World Factbook 2002, at

http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook.

2]Jon Talton, "French Ideals and Profits in the Iraqi Triangle", The Arizona Republic, February 23, 2003.

[3]Jon Talton, "French Ideals and Profits in the Iraqi Triangle," The Arizona Republic, February 23, 2003.

4]Kenneth Katzman, Iraq: Oil-for-Food Program, International Sanctions, and Illicit Trade, Congressional Research Service, September 26, 2002.

[5]Kenneth Katzman, Iraq: Oil-for-Food Program, International Sanctions, and Illicit Trade, Congressional Research Service, September 26, 2002.

[6]Evelyn Iritani, "Hussein's Government Signs Lucrative Contracts, Especially with Nations that Oppose the U.S. Led Effort to Oust the

Regime," The Los Angeles Verdana,Arial,Helvetica, November 11, 2002.

[7]Information from Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), "Arms Transfers to Iraq, 1981-2001," at http://projects.sipri.se/armstrade/IRQ_IMPORTS_1982-2001.pdf.

[8]David R. Sands, "France, Germany Protect Iraq Ties," The Washington Verdana,Arial,Helvetica, February 20, 2003.

[9]David R. Sands, "France, Germany Protect Iraq Ties," The Washington Verdana,Arial,Helvetica, February 20, 2003.

[10]"Africa Analysis-Trade Points Way to Peace", The Financial Verdana,Arial,Helvetica: Asia Africa Intelligence Wire, November 19, 2002.

[11]Faye Bowers, "Driving Forces in War-Wary Nations: The Stances of France, Germany, Russia and China Are Colored by Economic and National Interests," Christian Science Monitor, February 25, 2003.

[12]"Helping Saddam Rearm," The Wall Street Journal, October 11, 2002.

[13]Central Intelligence Agency, The World Factbook 2002, at http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook.

[14]Testimony provided by Ariel Cohen to the House International Relations Committee, "Russia and the Axis of Evil: Money, Ambition and U.S. Interests," February 26, 2003.

[15]Nelli Sharushkina, "Russia Plays the Field in Iraq-Mixed Signals Worry Baghdad," Energy Intelligence Briefing, February 5, 2003.

[16]Dan Morgan and David B. Ottaway, "In Iraqi War Scenario, Oil Is Key Issue," The Washington Post, September 15, 2002.

[17]Dan Morgan and David B. Ottaway, "In Iraqi War Scenario, Oil Is Key Issue," The Washington Post, September 15, 2002.

[18]Scott Peterson, "Russia's Newest Tie to Iraq: Moscow Is Set to Sign a $40 billion Economic Pact with Baghdad Next Month," Christian Science Monitor, August 20, 2002.

[19]"Mideast Tensions to Delay Iraq Iraqi-Russian Signing," Energy Compass, April 19, 2002.

[20]Dmitry Zhdannikov, "Russian's Grim About Working Under Saddam," The Houston Chronicle, April 14, 2002.

[21]Information from Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), "Arms Transfers to Iraq, 1981-2001," at http://projects.sipri.se/armstrade/IRQ_IMPORTS_1982-2001.pdf.

[22]Central Intelligence Agency, The World Factbook 2002, at http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook.

[23]Trish Saywell, "Oil: The Danger of Deals with Iraq," Far Eastern Economic Review, March 6, 2003.

[24]Kenneth R. Timmerman, "Rogues Lending Hand to Saddam," Insight on the News, March 4, 2003.

[25]Kenneth R. Timmerman, "Rogues Lending Hand to Saddam," Insight on the News, March 4, 2003.

[26]Information from Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), "Arms Transfers to Iraq, 1981-2001," at

http://projects.sipri.se/armstrade/IRQ_IMPORTS_1982-2001.pdf.





.