IsraPundit

WE'VE MOVED! IsraPundit has relocated to www.israpundit.com. Click here to go there now.
News and views on Israel, Zionism and the war on terrorism.

September 13, 2002

The Price Of Weakness

Micheal Freund reminds us that it was today in 1993 that the Oslo Accords were signed. The unimaginable tragedy that followed surely makes that day one that "will live in infamy." How ironic it falls so close to 9/11, another day that symbolizes the tragic failings of the appeasement obsessed left. How many bodies must pile up before we learn? How many five-year-olds must be shot by terrorist thugs in their bed before the ideologies of appeasement and surrender to evil are forever discredited? Even now the pied piper of the left Shimon Perez continues to insist that Oslo is a success and that it should be re-implemented under the guise of “Gaza First.” Even now Ben-Eliezer plots to deliver the children of Hebron to the murderers. Just yesterday, George Bush crawled to the thugocracy of terrorists, dictators, European collaborators and anti-Semites that make up the UN begging for permission to defend the US against the savages.

As I sit here looking at the ruins of the WTC outside my window, I wonder how many Munich Agreements can we live through? How many Hitlers and Stalins and Arafats can be allowed to murder Jews with impunity before somebody says enough? How long will Israel bow down to the murderers begging for “peace”? Why is the only solution building ghetto walls instead of victory? As the barbarians build their bombs we debate about “human rights” and the “peace process.” While the Kapos renounce their citizenship to gain favor in European high society, synagogues burn in Paris, Brussels and Kiev and the anti-Semites riot in Montreal, we are silent. The silence is deafening. The trains are rolling once again and we look to the UN for justice! The black smoke rises from the chimneys and we apologize for fighting back! Less than sixty years after Birkenau and Belzec we have already forgotten the price of weakness and disunity. G-d save us all.
(Jerusalem Post) Though different in form and in substance, 9/11 and 9/13 do share one important trait in common: they both exemplify the danger of Western inaction when confronting an implacable enemy.

Remember: 9/11 was the second, not the first, attempt to blow up the World Trade Center in Manhattan. In 1993, a truck bomb exploded underneath one of the towers, killing six Americans. Had the Clinton administration reacted as it should have, and launched its own war on terror, had it hunted down the perpetrators and refused to rest until Osama bin Laden was behind bars, who knows how much pain and suffering and even death might later have been averted?

Once bin Laden had joined the ranks of international terrorists, he should have been treated accordingly. But the fact is that he was not, and on September 11, we all learned just how shortsighted and deadly that decision proved to be.

THE SAME can be said for Israel's willingness to sign an accord with Arafat, treating him as a lofty statesman rather than a lowly killer. Brushing aside three decades of PLO terror, the government of Israel handed Arafat the keys to Judea, Samaria and Gaza, and allowed him to create a corrupt, authoritarian terrorist entity straddling the Jewish state's narrow boundaries.

It was an exercise in self-delusion. The desire to appease the enemy led Israel's leaders to think that yesterday's murderer could serve as today's peace partner.
Instead, had Israel acted as it should have, arresting Arafat and trying him for murder, rather than transforming him into a head of state, who knows how much turmoil and bloodshed might have been prevented? All told, 869 Israelis have been killed by Palestinian terrorists since the signing of the Oslo Accords, which is nearly twice the number that were killed in the 25 years that preceded the agreement. Clearly, the decision to accommodate Palestinian terror, rather than eliminate it, has proven to be a grave and fateful error on Israel's part. (Emphasis Added)